2005 Teaching Neuroscience Workshop at SFN - Teaching Neuroscience

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP ON TEACHING NEUROSCIENCE

Teaching Neuroscience

SCHEDULE   |   PANELISTS  |   LINKS TO PREVIOUS TEACHING WORKSHOPS

Sunday, November 13, 9:00 a.m. - 12 noon, Washington Convention Center Room 208

DESCRIPTION

 

For those contemplating their first course or revising an existing course, we present a workshop on teaching neuroscience in a variety of settings and levels: for undergraduates in large and small institutions, for graduate students in a neuroscience program, and for medical students.

We will begin with "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly," graduate students revealing what they have loved and hated about the courses they have taken, with additional contributions from the audience.

We will then hear examples of real courses taught by gifted teachers: Kathleen Siwicki, Swarthmore College (undergraduates, small college); John Hildebrand, University of Arizona (undergraduates, large university); Karen Gale, Georgetown University (graduate students, core course); and Mark Williams, Duke University (undergraduates and medical students, neuroanatomy). The panelists will explain the prerequisites, expectations, and goals for their courses; the decisions they made in creating their syllabus, assignments, and exams; which topics are easy and hard for their students; and the strengths and weaknesses of the books and resources they use. The audience will be able to ask questions after each presentation.

The workshop will conclude with a video on the art of lecturing by Patrick Winston, Professor of Artificial Intelligence at MIT, published by Harvard's Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning.

 

SCHEDULE

9:00

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Graduate students explain what makes a course good or bad, with additional contributions from the audience.

9:30

PLANNING A NEUROSCIENCE COURSE: A PANEL

Neurobiology for undergraduates: small college.

Kathleen Siwicki, Swarthmore College     SYLLABUS     PRESENTATION SLIDES (PDF)

9:55

Neurobiology for undergraduates: large university.

John Hildebrand, University of Arizona     SYLLABUS (PDF)     PRESENTATION SLIDES (PDF)

10:20

break

10:40

Core neuroscience for graduate students.

Karen Gale, Georgetown University     EXAMPLES     PRESENTATION SLIDES (PDF)

11:05

Clinical neuroanatomy for undergraduates.

Mark Williams, Duke University     SYLLABUS (PDF)     SCHEDULE (PDF)     PRESENTATION SLIDES (PDF)     SYLVIUS

11:30

LECTURING TIPS (video)

Patrick Winston, MIT     VIEW VIDEO  (QuickTime)

 

PANELISTS

 

Kathleen Siwicki

Professor and Chair of Biology, Swarthmore College. Recipient of 2004 Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award; Director of Swarthmore's HHMI Undergraduate Science Education programs; Co-Organizer of East Coast Nerve Net; Summer Investigator at Marine Biological Laboratory. Dr. Siwicki teaches undergraduate neurobiology courses, labs, and advanced seminars, and mentors student research in Drosophila behavioral genetics.

John Hildebrand

Regents Professor and Professor of Neurobiology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics, Entomology, and Molecular & Cellular Biology, University of Arizona; Director, Arizona Research Laboratories Division of Neurobiology; formerly, Chair of the Program in Neuroscience. Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, co-editor of the Journal of Comparative Physiology, and former president of the International Society for Neuroethology and the Association of Neuroscience Departments and Programs.

Karen Gale

Professor of Pharmacology, and founding Director, Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience, Georgetown University. Recipient of the 2003 AWIS-Bethesda mentoring award; representative to the Carnegie Foundation Initiative on the Doctorate in Neuroscience. Dr. Gale has been a mentor to numerous thesis students, postdoctoral fellows, and undergraduates.

Mark Williams

Senior Research Scientist, Department of Neurobiology, Duke University. Co-director of the medical neurobiology course; instructor, clinical neuroanatomy for undergraduate, pre-medical, and psychology students. Author of numerous neuroanatomical research papers, developer of the neuroanatomy educational software Sylvius, and an editor of the widely-used introductory text Neuroscience (Sinauer Associates).

Richard Olivo (chair)

Associate Director, Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, Harvard University, and Professor of Biological Sciences and member of the Program in Neuroscience, Smith College. Developer of "MacRetina," a simulated experiment to record from retinal ganglion cells, and author of an extensive Web site for teaching a neurophysiology laboratory course using invertebrates.